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4 Reasons why seminars are good and useful

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4 Reasons why seminars are good and useful

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"Anything can be used to achieve the opposite of what it was meant for"

Having exposed reasons why seminars are useless, it was only fit to expose why they can also be useful. We will assume in this article that the seminars are given by a guest instructor. It shall also be assumed that the guest instructors are competent and bring in different insights and training methods. (Or else, why would people participate?)

 

1- Seminars break the routine

One of the common complaints of practitioners is that classes tend to enter a routine of spiraling boredom. The root cause of this feeling of boredom could be the instructor for being predictable or by the impatient students who fail to see the value in repetition. It really doesn’t matter what the cause is. What’s important is that seminars bring freshness into what could be a stale training routine.

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(Not what we meant by breaking the routine)

 

2- Exposes the practitioner to a new point of view.

The guest instructor, coming with his baggage of experience as both a fighter and a competitor can show students a new way of practicing or strengthening known techniques. A small detail brought on by an outsider may help greatly enhance the effectiveness of some of the even most basic techniques.

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Shihan Yokota demonstrates the biomechannics of a kick.

This new perspective is sometimes the key to unlocking unseen principles, allowing the student to reach a new level.

Of course, the instructor must come with something to offer new and the student must have the open mindedness and skill to absorb the new information in such a short time.

 

 

3- Seminars allow the participant to concentrate fully on your training.

Because seminars are planned in advance, practitioners can mentally and physically prepare to be at their maximum and fully benefit from the training. They can usually dedicate the whole days in which the seminar occurs exclusively for their advancement in the art of their choice. During those days, they train, eat and sleep on martial arts.

Such dedication is often needed to discover unseen weaknesses that may need correcting.

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Dedication: Training despite being very pregnant

 

4- Seminars allows the participant to meet fellow practitioners in a friendly environment

Aside from the few usual training hall mates, practitioners seldom meet other martial artists that share their passion, except maybe during competitions. The thing with competitions is that despite apparent friendliness of the competitors and the tournament itself, contestants are usually thinking about how to stylishly beat one another up.

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That's a friendly kick!

Seminars on the other hand, foster a friendly environment where ever people’s goal is to train and develop their skills in harmony with other participants. In fact, they depend on the goodwill of others to properly execute certain 2 people techniques.

 

 


 

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Last Updated on Sunday, 08 April 2012 12:40  

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